Nutrient pollution confirmed as cause of Biscayne Bay fish kill

Nutrient pollution confirmed as cause of Biscayne Bay fish kill

MIAMI (WSVN) - Officials have confirmed the cause of last month's massive fish kill in Biscayne Bay. According to the nonprofit Miami Waterkeeper, nutrient pollution from fertilizer runoff and sewage leaks led to the death of marine life in a green, murky Miami waterway, Aug. 10.


Saving Biscayne Bay


Saving Biscayne Bay: Miami-Dade needs summer fertilizer ban, scientists say

Saving Biscayne Bay: Miami-Dade needs summer fertilizer ban, scientists say

MIAMI - Jim Kirk has been a landscaper in South Florida for more than two decades. He said fertilizer doesn't have to be used so frequently. Once applied, he said, it lasts for about three months. Kirk said he is worried about how the overuse of fertilizer affects water quality.


Environmental groups sue feds to protect Nassau grouper habitat in Florida, elsewhere

Environmental groups sue feds to protect Nassau grouper habitat in Florida, elsewhere - WMNF

Three conservation organizations have sued the federal government for not protecting the nearshore habitat for a threatened fish, the Nassau grouper. The groups say the Nassau grouper is threatened by pollution, ocean acidification, sea-level rise and other impacts of climate change. In their lawsuit filed against the National Marine Fisheries Service Tuesday, the environmental groups...


Conservation groups sued the federal government for failing to protect the nearshore habitat of the Nassau grouper

Trump Administration Sued for Failing to Protect Nassau Grouper Habitat

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. - Conservation groups sued the federal government today for failing to protect the nearshore habitat of the Nassau grouper, which faces threats from pollution and climate change impacts such as sea-level rise and ocean acidification. "Protected habitat will help set these fish on the path to recovery, but the federal government has stalled this designation for years.


‘Like Groundhog day’: New report has same old findings on how to save Biscayne Bay

'Like Groundhog day': New report has same old findings on how to save Biscayne Bay

There's a new plan to save ailing Biscayne Bay, and it looks a lot like the old plan - and the one before that. For decades, scientists and environmentalists have done more than plead with politicians to protect South Florida's crown jewel: They've written studies, held summits and presented action plans.


Task force submits more than 60 recommendations to save Biscayne Bay

Task force submits more than 60 recommendations to save Biscayne Bay

MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, Fla. - The Biscayne Bay Task Force gave an urgent and final call to the Miami-Dade County Commission Monday morning to act now to save Biscayne Bay. "The bay watershed continues to be threatened by lack of fresh water, sewage pollution, storm water runoff and other pollutants," Irela Bague, chair of the Biscayne Bay Task Force, said.


BISCAYNE BAY'S FISH KILL AND ALGAE BLOOMS

BISCAYNE BAY'S FISH KILL AND ALGAE BLOOMS

Biscayne Bay has reached a tipping point. Too much pollution from septic tanks, sewer leaks, stormwater drains, and fertilizers led to a fish kill. Decaying fish have likely now led to severe algae blooms. This latest crisis is in addition to the die-off of the Bay’s seagrass. Clean water is what makes Miami, Miami. We need to stop the pollution. Want to get involved? Support Miami Waterkeeper, a local non-profit that protects the water you love. Miami Waterkeeper has been coordinating with the public, scientists, elected officials, agencies, and the media. Click HERE to read more and get involved.


'Decades Of Warning Signs' Preceded Biscayne Bay Fish Kill

'Decades Of Warning Signs' Preceded Biscayne Bay Fish Kill

In the wake of a fish kill that littered the shores of northern Biscayne Bay with floating fish carcasses, scientists are trying to parse exactly what triggered the lethal event.


Scientists determine algae species in bay not toxic, warnings still remain

Scientists determine algae species in bay not toxic, warnings still remain

NORTH MIAMI, Fla. - San Souci in French? It means no worries. But at the San Souci Estates, residents these days have a lot to worry about. As a matter of fact, all of us who call South Florida home have plenty to worry about, too.


Check out the latest @MiamiWaterkpr stories from the press:
Press
HomeMiami Waterkeeper is a South Florida Environmental Group that advocates for Swimmable, Drinkable, Fishable water for all. Working on sea rise, water pollution, coral reef protection, and water issue education.