Bay Day 2018 Crest Sponsor: Biscayne Bank!

Thank you to our crest sponsor- Biscayne Bank!

 


FPL’s Turkey Point Plant has Problems, and now FPL wants it to run even longer

FPL’s Turkey Point nuclear plant is contaminating Biscayne National Park, the Biscayne Aquifer (our primary source of drinking water) and filling nearby wetlands with salt. Despite the myriad of environmental and safety problems with the plant, and while currently engaged in corrective action that may or may not work, Florida Power and Light (FPL) is now asking the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to relicense these units. A license from the NRC would make Units 3 & 4 the oldest operating nuclear reactors in the United States and would allow them to operate until 2052 – giving them an unprecedented 80-year operating life! These reactors are already the hottest operating reactors in the U.S. and are the only reactors worldwide that use a cooling canal system rather than cooling towers.

nrc_relicensing_comments.jpgMiami Waterkeeper Staff Attorney, Kelly Cox, delivers comments before the Nuclear Regulatory Commission


Community Solutions Program and Miami Waterkeeper, Unite!

Join Miami Waterkeeper in welcoming Melva Rosa Gil Vera as she joins us for four months to teach us about her work and learn from ours through the Community Solutions Program!

The Community Solutions Program (CSP), sponsored by the Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) and implemented by IREX, is a professional development program for the best and brightest global community leaders working in Environmental Issues, Tolerance and Conflict Resolution, Transparency and Accountability, and Women and Gender Issues. Melva is among 100 individuals from around the world selected to participate in the program this year, and we are so excited to have her expertise on our team.


PortMiami Settlement will fund restoration of 10,000 corals

Lawsuit over Dredging Achieves Restoration of 10,000 threatened corals 

Celebrate our legal victory with us!

                     

It's been a long four years of battling the Army Corps of Engineers over the damage they caused to our reefs during the dredging of the Port of Miami, but now there are 10,000 reasons to celebrate. 

Miami Waterkeeper and our co-plaintiffs Captain Dan Kipnis, Miami-Dade Reef Guard Association, and Tropical Audubon Society, have finally reached a settlement that will result in the restoration of 10,000 federally protected staghorn corals in Miami-Dade County over the next three years, carried out by the Lirman lab at the University of Miami. Funding will also be provided to the Miami-Dade County Mooring Buoy program to prevent anchor damage on reefs. This settlement is in addition to the hundreds of staghorn corals that we rescued during the dredging, at an estimated value of $14 million to the public.


Environmentally-Friendly Gardening Tips!

Environmentally-Friendly Gardening Tips

Do you use fertilizer on your lawn or landscape? Do you know if you’ve been applying fertilizer correctly? When over-applied or applied incorrectly, fertilizer can be very harmful for the environment. Over-fertilizing plants in a lawn or landscape can lead to pest problems, excessive growth, and the pollution of waterways and groundwater.


MWK Spotlight: Dana Biddle

 

Our Miami Marine Stadium Cleanup in April was successful for many reasons- we collected a ton of trash from entering Biscayne Bay, we had a great collaborative effort with the Miami Rowing Club and Miami Parks and Recreation, AND we met some cool people to help us in our efforts. Dana Biddle was one of them- a student at the University of Miami, about to graduate, but still filled with passion to clean our waterways and create awareness about the marine debris issue that is so pertinent throughout the World. After driving off with much of the trash we collected that day, she created an art project to bring attention to the state of our oceans.

 


Don't Forget Your Boat!

 

Have you noticed abandoned or derelict vessels in Biscayne Bay? Because we have quite a lot of them. These vessels are both navigational hazards and eyesores for our community. Derelict vessels ranging from large commercial ships to smaller recreational boats can shift during storms, destroying crucial benthic habitat – the bottom of a body of water, such as seagrass or coral reefs. Furthermore, toxic chemicals that were onboard at the time of sinking, or oil spills from the vessel itself, pose a threat to surrounding ecosystems and to human health. Additional debris from the vessels such as fishing gear, nets, and other dispersed trash can harm marine life as well.

 

 


MWK Spotlight: David Bouck

David Bouck presenting his Master's thesis entitled "Determining Trends in Water Quality Using High Resolution Land Use Data"

 

Biscayne Bay and its surrounding waterways are widely known as ecologically important areas. Coral reefs, seagrasses and mangroves protect nearly everything from juvenile fish to us as inhabitants of this large urban region. As part of their Habitat Blue Print program, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) made this loud and clear when they chose Biscayne Bay as one of 10 Habitat Focus Areas to focus their time and resources on conserving this important estuary. the Habitat Focus Areas have one thing in common- they are at an ecological tipping point and need help from scientists and other advocates to save them before it is too late. Miami Waterkeeper headed up a NOAA Habitat Focus Area grant, in partnership with many key players at the University of Miami and UF/IFAS Florida Sea Grant, to address "The Human Dimensions of Biscayne Bay: Socioeconomics, Spatial Modeling, and Community Engagement." Under this grant, Master's candidate David Bouck completed research related to nutrient loading in Biscayne Bay that was crucial to enhancing our understanding of the Bay's evolving water quality. Learn more about Bouck and his contribution to protecting this focus area!

 

 


Working on Water Quality

 

Your Waterkeeper, Dr. Rachel Silverstein, sampling water quality in Biscayne Bay.

As Miami Waterkeeper continues to collaborate with other local groups in combating the ongoing threat of marine debris, we also continue our work on an equally serious but less visually perceivable marine issue: water quality. Water quality problems have persisted in the region but go largely unnoticed because it’s easier to turn a blind eye to something that you cannot see. However, the health issues for both marine life and humans is extensive, and so it is important that the issue gets the attention it deserves.

Marine_Debris_and_Water_Quality_NOAA_Graphic.jpg

Marine Debris and Good Water Quality are Ranked the Highest in Importance by the Public


MWK Spotlight: Jessica Perkins


It is no secret that outreach and education are the cornerstones of what we do at Miami Waterkeeper. Our jurisdiction lies in Miami-Dade and Broward counties, but we hope to see the positive impact of our work expand way beyond our local waterways. Jessica Perkins, known as Miss Perkins to her students, is an art educator working in Wallingford, Vermont, and a friend to Miami Waterkeeper. She carried our message up to the land-locked state of Vermont, and her students made our organization “thank you notes” in the form of art. Read more about Miss Perkins inspiration, and how no matter your connection to water, you can share the lessons of conservation in your everyday jobs.  

 


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