The Murky Waters of the Beach Bacteria Problem

The Murky Waters of the Beach Bacteria Problem - Key News

Last week's 'no-contact' water advisory was a tipping point for many residents, who wrote to Village Council members and spoke up at the Oct. 15 meeting to ask for definitive action to address the problem. But with answers elusive, Village staff navigate murky waters.


Miami Waterkeeper Training Wants “1,000 Eyes on the Water”

Miami Waterkeeper Training Wants "1,000 Eyes on the Water" - Key News

With serious water quality issues swirling around Key Biscayne, several dozen people attended a training session Thursday at the Key Biscayne Community Center to learn how to help patrol the water. Miami Waterkeeper Program Director Laura Chaibongsai opened proceedings by introducing the organization, which is dedicated to ensuring swimmable, drinkable , fishable water for all.


Sewage, dangerous bacteria are entering oceans, closing Miami beaches

Sewage, dangerous bacteria are entering oceans, closing Miami beaches

A power outage at the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department's Central District Wastewater Treatment Plant resulted in 100,000 gallons of treated waste being released into the ocean. On Saturday, Oct. 12th, a no swimming advisory was posted at affected beach areas within Virginia Key, Key Biscayne, and Fisher Island, and was lifted October 17th.


Florida-Friendly Landscape Options

Good fertilizing practices are essential for near-shore water quality improvement. But, there are other things you can do that can further help the environment, including Florida-friendly landscaping! 

 

Images Courtesy of Knoll Landscape Design & PlantsMap


INNOVATE MIAMI, a snapshot of Miami’s innovation ecosystem, nearing completion

INNOVATE MIAMI, a snapshot of Miami's innovation ecosystem, nearing completion

INNOVATE MIAMI will showcase the companies, entrepreneurs, and organizations that contribute to Miami's innovation ecosystem in a 300+ page, high-end coffee-table book that is also tech-enabled TAMPA, FL / ACCESSWIRE / October 9, 2019 / MIAMI, FL-A tech-enabled, high-end coffee-table book is in production for Miami-Dade County.


No-Swim Advisories for Key Biscayne Beaches as Bacteria Rises Again

No-Swim Advisories for Key Biscayne Beaches as Bacteria Rises Again - Key News

Another weekend, another change of plans for would-be beachgoers. Tests this week prompted the Florida Department of Health to issue swimming advisories for Key Biscayne Beach, Crandon Park North, and all of Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park.


Flesh-Eating Bacteria: Staying Safe while Swimming

This summer was riddled with concern about emerging threats from flesh-eating bacteria in our coastal waters. Here's what you need to know about the bacteria and how to stay safe while swimming!

 

 


In Florida, Flushing the Toilet Is Threatened by Rising Sea Levels for Tens of Thousands of Homeowners

In Florida, Flushing the Toilet Is Threatened by Rising Sea Levels for Tens of Thousands of Homeowners | The Weather Channel

The effects of rising sea levels, such as nuisance flooding, are pretty obvious above ground. But lying just below the surface is a threat that could impact millions of people, especially those living along the country's coasts. These homes use septic tanks that rely on dry soil to work properly.


Village of Islamorada Passes a Fertilizer Ordinance!

Congratulations to the Village of Islamorada for passing a fertilizer ordinance aimed at improving water quality in nearshore waters!

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Image Source: www.travel1000places.com

Miami Waterkeeper in D.C. for oral arguments before the Nuclear Regulatory Commission

Two weeks ago Miami Waterkeeper traveled up to our nation’s capital, Washington D.C., for oral arguments before the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The hearing was in regard to FPL’s Turkey Point Nuclear Power Plant’s proposed operating license renewal. Why are we concerned with FPL getting approval for this operating license? Well, a nuclear generator acts similarly to a steam engine in that it creates really hot water that needs to be cooled down. Unlike most other nuclear power plants, FPL uses a system of cooling canals like a radiator to achieve this goal. The problem is that these canals are unlined, which means that the really hot, salty, nutrient-rich water is able to leech down into the ground and travel in all directions due to the porous limestone geology beneath the plant. The salty subsurface water, referred to as the hypersaline plume, has been gradually moving toward the groundwater supply, which is our primary source of drinking water here in South Florida. The plume is now migrating at about a foot a day! The plume is also moving east towards Biscayne Bay, an area that offers critical protection to sensitive ecosystems, wildlife, and unique habitats, and supports the local economy through recreation opportunities, tourism, and the provision of ecological goods and services.


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