Legal Advocacy updates, Shop for a Cause, and more!

Delivered: March 2017

We’ve had a busy March!

  • Our supporters (like you!) submitted over 10,000 comments asking for stronger reef protections in the Port Everglades expansion project.
  • We’ve exposed the Army Corps for distributing “alternative facts” to the public in both Port Miami and Port Everglades.
  • We’ve helped get the ball rolling on a plastic grocery bag ban in Coral Gables to reduce marine debris.
  • And we got to hang out with Phillippe Cousteau, Jr. on World Water Day by collecting water quality samples with local schools at the Biscayne Nature Center!

You asked: Why do we still dump sewage on our beaches?

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Corps to replant 10,000 threatened corals to settle fight over Miami dredge

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PortMiami Settlement E-News

Lawsuit over Dredging Achieves Restoration of 10,000 threatened corals 

Celebrate our legal victory with us!

                      

It's been a long four years of battling the Army Corps of Engineers over the damage they caused to our reefs during the dredging of the Port of Miami, but now there are 10,000 reasons to celebrate. 

Miami Waterkeeper and our co-plaintiffs Captain Dan Kipnis, Miami-Dade Reef Guard Association, and Tropical Audubon Society, have finally reached a settlement that will result in the restoration of 10,000 federally protected staghorn corals in Miami-Dade County over the next three years, carried out by the Lirman lab at the University of Miami. Funding will also be provided to the Miami-Dade County Mooring Buoy program to prevent anchor damage on reefs. This settlement is in addition to the hundreds of staghorn corals that we rescued during the dredging, at an estimated value of $14 million to the public.

 


PortMiami Settlement will fund restoration of 10,000 corals

Lawsuit over Dredging Achieves Restoration of 10,000 threatened corals 

Celebrate our legal victory with us!

                     

It's been a long four years of battling the Army Corps of Engineers over the damage they caused to our reefs during the dredging of the Port of Miami, but now there are 10,000 reasons to celebrate. 

Miami Waterkeeper and our co-plaintiffs Captain Dan Kipnis, Miami-Dade Reef Guard Association, and Tropical Audubon Society, have finally reached a settlement that will result in the restoration of 10,000 federally protected staghorn corals in Miami-Dade County over the next three years, carried out by the Lirman lab at the University of Miami. Funding will also be provided to the Miami-Dade County Mooring Buoy program to prevent anchor damage on reefs. This settlement is in addition to the hundreds of staghorn corals that we rescued during the dredging, at an estimated value of $14 million to the public.


Environmentally-Friendly Gardening Tips!

Environmentally-Friendly Gardening Tips

Do you use fertilizer on your lawn or landscape? Do you know if you’ve been applying fertilizer correctly? When over-applied or applied incorrectly, fertilizer can be very harmful for the environment. Over-fertilizing plants in a lawn or landscape can lead to pest problems, excessive growth, and the pollution of waterways and groundwater.


MWK Spotlight: Dana Biddle

 

Our Miami Marine Stadium Cleanup in April was successful for many reasons- we collected a ton of trash from entering Biscayne Bay, we had a great collaborative effort with the Miami Rowing Club and Miami Parks and Recreation, AND we met some cool people to help us in our efforts. Dana Biddle was one of them- a student at the University of Miami, about to graduate, but still filled with passion to clean our waterways and create awareness about the marine debris issue that is so pertinent throughout the World. After driving off with much of the trash we collected that day, she created an art project to bring attention to the state of our oceans.

 


Don't Forget Your Boat!

 

Have you noticed abandoned or derelict vessels in Biscayne Bay? Because we have quite a lot of them. These vessels are both navigational hazards and eyesores for our community. Derelict vessels ranging from large commercial ships to smaller recreational boats can shift during storms, destroying crucial benthic habitat – the bottom of a body of water, such as seagrass or coral reefs. Furthermore, toxic chemicals that were onboard at the time of sinking, or oil spills from the vessel itself, pose a threat to surrounding ecosystems and to human health. Additional debris from the vessels such as fishing gear, nets, and other dispersed trash can harm marine life as well.

 

 


No More Plastic Straws: With an Eye on the Environment, Village Works Toward Ban

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Meet Rachel Silverstein of Miami Waterkeeper

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