Legal Advocacy updates, Shop for a Cause, and more!

Delivered: March 2017

We’ve had a busy March!

  • Our supporters (like you!) submitted over 10,000 comments asking for stronger reef protections in the Port Everglades expansion project.
  • We’ve exposed the Army Corps for distributing “alternative facts” to the public in both Port Miami and Port Everglades.
  • We’ve helped get the ball rolling on a plastic grocery bag ban in Coral Gables to reduce marine debris.
  • And we got to hang out with Phillippe Cousteau, Jr. on World Water Day by collecting water quality samples with local schools at the Biscayne Nature Center!

Action Alert: Protect Biscayne Bay from FPL's Pollution

Biscayne Bay is at an ecological tipping point – this fragile ecosystem simply can’t handle additional pollutants.

10Oct10-4.jpg

We need YOUR help.

Next week, the Miami-Dade County Commission is voting on a proposed agreement with FPL that would allow the company to use the County's wastewater to clean up the Cooling Canal System at Turkey Point. Using this "reuse" water is a good idea, but we need to be sure it's treated to a high enough level where it won't harm the Bay or our drinking water supply - the aquifer.

The Cooling Canals are currently leaking pollution into our aquifer and Biscayne Bay. The water that goes into the canal system will end up in the Bay. Therefore, we have to be sure that any reuse water that goes into the canals is also clean enough for Biscayne Bay. 

Dirty water in the cooling canals = Dirty Water in Biscayne Bay.

Right now, the agreement does not require FPL to clean the wastewater to a level where it won't harm Biscayne Bay. What's the solution?

INCLUDE WATER QUALITY STANDARDS NOW

Miami Waterkeeper has been urging Commissioners to include water quality standards in the agreement so that there is no risk of adding to our Bay's pollution problems. 

We need YOU to make sure the County and FPL are doing #reuseright

Call your County Commissioner and ask for the agreement with FPL to: 

  • Include Water Quality Standards -- Wastewater must be treated to meet water quality standards for Biscayne Bay. Once treated properly, additional reuse water can and should be reserved for environmentally beneficial projects to restore wetlands and Biscayne Bay.

 

  • Get rid of the Cooling Canal System – This agreement would help FPL extend its operating license of their plant another 20 years – longer than any other plant in the United States! If this plant is allowed to operate for that long, FPL must update its cooling technology to cooling towers. Period. The Canals are outdating and continually contaminating our Bay and Aquifer – we can’t allow them to continue operation.

Find your County Commissioner here.

ATTEND the Board of County Commissioners Meeting April 10, 9am, Stephen P. Clark Commission Chambers, 111 NW 1 St., Miami, FL 33128. Show your support for #reuseright!

 

Kelly_Speaking_at_Commission_Toxics_Rule_1-17-18.jpg

What has Miami Waterkeeper done so far on this issue? Read our letters here.

Letter to Mayor Giménez

Corrections of statements made at the Chairman's Policy Committee 

And watch Program Director and Staff Attorney, Kelly Cox, speaking on behalf of this issue at the County Commission Meeting HERE!

 

Support This Campaign!

Become a Member!


A Success and a Hello!

Keeping Toxic Chemicals Out of Your Water -- UPDATE!

IT WORKED. You signed petitions. You made calls. You said no toxic water in Florida. And we won. Just a few weeks ago, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), withdrew their dangerous rule that would have allowed increased levels of toxic chemicals in Florida’s surface waters. Miami Waterkeeper along with the St. Johns Riverkeeper and EarthJustice, have been campaigning against this rule since it was proposed in 2016.  

“This rule was inappropriate from the start and was plagued with problems from the science to the public process to the conclusion by Gov. Scott’s DEP that it is ok to increase cancer risk for Floridians through exposure to toxic chemicals.” says Rachel Silverstein, Executive Director and Waterkeeper of Miami Waterkeeper.

pipe_pollution.jpg

FDEP will now reexamine the science behind the rule and, we hope, improve public outreach and engagement in the rulemaking process.

“We are thrilled that, after challenges from non-profit groups, the public, elected officials, municipalities like the City of Miami and Miami-Dade County, and the Seminole tribe, DEP has reconsidered and will reexamine its science,” Silverstein said.

Read more HERE.

Wastewater Reuse: an Obligation & Opportunity for Miami-Dade County

Miami-Dade County has the chance to turn an obligation into an opportunity! The County must reuse 60% of its wastewater by 2025. You may have heard about a new plan that proposes an agreement between the County and FPL to divert some of that reuse water to FPL's Turkey Point cooling canals. While reusing wastewater has the potential to solve multiple problems, the current deal before the County does not require that the wastewater be treated to a level where it is won’t degrade Biscayne Bay.

In short, we're concerned that water quality standards are not specified at this stage in the agreement. We simply can't have more contaminated water eventually finding its way into the Bay or our drinking water supply. We’re also concerned that this proposed agreement doesn’t specify a certain amount of water for our freshwater-starved Bay, wetlands, and aquifer – all of which desperately need a source of clean, fresh water!

We’ll be speaking at the County Commission this Thursday about this issue and we invite you to join us! Details on this public comment opportunity are available HERE.

Read our letter to the County Commissioners HERE and read Commissioner Levine Cava’s op-ed about this topic HERE

rachel_at_commission.png

Introducing: Dana Tricarico – Miami Waterkeeper’s New Outreach Coordinator!

Please join us in welcoming our new staff member, Dana! Dana is a graduate of the University of Miami where she received her Master’s degree in Marine Conservation. Following graduation, Dana worked at Biscayne National Park in the invasive lionfish program and then as a contracted fisheries biologist where she coordinated NOAA’s Pelagic Observer Program. At Miami Waterkeeper, Dana will be heading up community education and engagement activities. Learn more about Dana and get in touch HERE

dana_intro_photo.jpg

Ready to get involved?

Continue to support our work by becoming a member today!

 become_a_member.png

Join us for an upcoming event. Click the banner below for more info

mwk_events_banner.png

 

See you on the water!

 

Miami Waterkeeper’s mission is to defend, protect, and preserve South Florida’s watershed through citizen engagement and community action rooted in sound science and research. We work to ensure swimmable, drinkable, fishable water for all. Through our efforts, we hope to maintain a clean and vibrant South Florida watershed and coastal culture for generations to come.

Make a contribution today

 

2103 Coral Way, 2nd Fl, Miami, FL 33145

(305) 905-0856


Could putting treated sewage in FPL nuclear canals pollute Biscayne Bay? Critics say yes

[embedlycard url="http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/environment/article208090509.html"]

 

Read Our "Action Alert" to see what Miami Waterkeeper has done thus to protect our waterways from this issue, and to learn how you can help!


Earth Month Kickoff Giveaway

Official Sweepstakes Rules


Miami Waterkeeper Weighs In To Help U.S. Coast Guard modify the Port of Miami Anchorage Area

The U.S.Coast Guard began a process on December 1, 2015, to evaluate the Miami Anchorage because of the coral reefs off the Florida coast. Miami Waterkeeper was one of the interested parties to help alter the anchorage configuration.


Metabolic Studio provides support to Miami Waterkeeper to Protect South Florida’s Watershed

Metabolic Studio provides support to Miami Waterkeeper to Protect South Florida’s Watershed

Miami, FL – Miami Waterkeeper has received support from the Metabolic Studio for the ongoing and future efforts to monitor water quality in Biscayne Bay and the surrounding waterways.


A Victory and A Hello!

Keeping Toxic Chemicals Out of Your Water -- UPDATE!

IT WORKED. You signed petitions. You made calls. You said no toxic water in Florida. And we won. Just a few weeks ago, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), withdrew their dangerous rule that would have allowed increased levels of toxic chemicals in Florida’s surface waters. Miami Waterkeeper along with the St. Johns Riverkeeper and EarthJustice, have been campaigning against this rule since it was proposed in 2016.  

“This rule was inappropriate from the start and was plagued with problems from the science to the public process to the conclusion by Gov. Scott’s DEP that it is ok to increase cancer risk for Floridians through exposure to toxic chemicals.” says Rachel Silverstein, Executive Director and Waterkeeper of Miami Waterkeeper.

pipe_pollution.jpg

FDEP will now reexamine the science behind the rule and, we hope, improve public outreach and engagement in the rulemaking process.

“We are thrilled that, after challenges from non-profit groups, the public, elected officials, municipalities like the City of Miami and Miami-Dade County, and the Seminole tribe, DEP has reconsidered and will reexamine its science,” Silverstein said.

Read more HERE.

Wastewater Reuse: an Obligation & Opportunity for Miami-Dade County

Miami-Dade County has the chance to turn an obligation into an opportunity! The County must reuse 60% of its wastewater by 2025. You may have heard about a new plan that proposes an agreement between the County and FPL to divert some of that reuse water to FPL's Turkey Point cooling canals. While reusing wastewater has the potential to solve multiple problems, the current deal before the County does not require that the wastewater be treated to a level where it is won’t degrade Biscayne Bay.

In short, we're concerned that water quality standards are not specified at this stage in the agreement. We simply can't have more contaminated water eventually finding its way into the Bay or our drinking water supply. We’re also concerned that this proposed agreement doesn’t specify a certain amount of water for our freshwater-starved Bay, wetlands, and aquifer – all of which desperately need a source of clean, fresh water!

We’ll be speaking at the County Commission this Thursday about this issue and we invite you to join us! Details on this public comment opportunity are available HERE.

Read our letter to the County Commissioners HERE and read Commissioner Levine Cava’s op-ed about this topic HERE

rachel_at_commission.png

Introducing: Dana Tricarico – Miami Waterkeeper’s New Outreach Coordinator!

Please join us in welcoming our new staff member, Dana! Dana is a graduate of the University of Miami where she received her Master’s degree in Marine Conservation. Following graduation, Dana worked at Biscayne National Park in the invasive lionfish program and then as a contracted fisheries biologist where she coordinated NOAA’s Pelagic Observer Program. At Miami Waterkeeper, Dana will be heading up community education and engagement activities. Learn more about Dana and get in touch HERE

dana_intro_photo.jpg

Ready to get involved?

Continue to support our work by becoming a member today!

 become_a_member.png

Join us for an upcoming event. Click the banner below for more info

mwk_events_banner.png

 

See you on the water!

 

Miami Waterkeeper’s mission is to defend, protect, and preserve South Florida’s watershed through citizen engagement and community action rooted in sound science and research. We work to ensure swimmable, drinkable, fishable water for all. Through our efforts, we hope to maintain a clean and vibrant South Florida watershed and coastal culture for generations to come.

Make a contribution today

 


How the Regional Climate Action Plan Impacts Water

One of the successes of the Climate Compact is the development of a unified sea-level rise projection that will avoid more scenarios like this in the future. Image Credit: Miami Today News

 


FDEP Withdraws Rule That Would Have Allowed More Toxic Chemicals in Florida’s Waters After Challenges

For Immediate Release, February 14, 2018

Contact:         

Rachel Silverstein, Miami Waterkeeper, (305) 905-0856, rachel@miamiwaterkeeper.org

Lisa Rinaman, St. Johns Riverkeeper, (904) 509-3260 lisa@stjohnsriverkeeper.org

Tania Galloni, Earthjustice, (305) 440-5432


 


Check out this blog from Miami Waterkeeper!
Latest News
Home